Al Yellon's SABR Page
Society for American Baseball Research
The Society for American Baseball Research was founded in Cooperstown, New York, in 1971, to further the study and research of the game of baseball.

I am one of more than 6,000 members of the Society, which publishes several research publications each year, including annual editions called the Baseball Research Journal and the National Pastime.

I'm sure the Society wouldn't mind if I tell you how to join.

You can reach them by mail at 812 Huron Rd. E. #719 Cleveland, OH. 44115

Their phone number is 216-575-0500

and their fax number is 216-575-0502.

If you're a baseball fan, this is a great way to get in touch with other fans who share the same interests as you do, as they publish a directory with members' addresses and baseball interests. The publications are always interesting, and they accept submissions from members. They're included as part of your annual membership fee.

You can find out more about SABR at the SABR home page.

Among the three articles I have authored for SABR publications was an article which appeared in the 1994 National Pastime entitled "Team All-Time Records", which combined the records of all baseball franchises since 1876, putting them in order by league and winning percentage. Following is an update to that article, with standings through the 2004 season, along with some notes.

No. NATIONAL LEAGUE Years Games Won Lost Tied Pct. Inter.

1. New York-SF Giants 1883-2004 18580 9962 8461 157 .541 72-56

2. Brooklyn-LA Dodgers 1890-2004 17717 9225 8373 119 .524 70-58

3. Chicago Cubs 1876-2004 19113 9756 9203 154 .515 60-55

4. Pittsburgh Pirates 1887-2004 18120 9186 8805 129 .511 44-65

5. St. Louis Cardinals 1892-2004 17469 8801 8539 129 .508 64-51

6. Arizona Diamondbacks 1998-2004 1134 575 559 0 .507 53-56

7. Cincinnati Reds 1890-2004 17742 8898 8719 125 .505 48-61

8. Bos-Mil-Atlanta Braves 1876-2004 19079 9443 9484 152 .499 79-57

9. Houston Astros 1962-2004 6842 3408 3430 4 .498 63-53

10. Montreal Expos 1969-2004 5702 2755 2943 4 .484 69-70

11. New York Mets 1962-2004 6834 3228 3598 8 .473 72-64

12. Colorado Rockies 1993-2004 1881 882 999 0 .46889 49-66

13. Florida Marlins 1993-2004 1877 880 997 0 .46883 77-58

14. Philadelphia Phillies 1883-2004 18507 8591 9805 111 .467 66-70

15. San Diego Padres 1969-2004 5707 2611 3094 2 .458 60-68

16. Defunct Clubs(below) 1876-1899 10605 4710 5702 193 .452 ----

17. Milwaukee Brewers 1998-2004 1133 480 652 1 .424 42-52

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NL TOTALS 188042 93391 93363 1288 .50007 988-960

No. AMERICAN LEAGUE Years Games Won Lost Tied Pct. Inter.

1. New York Yankees 1903-2004 15876 8979 6809 88 .569 82-56

2. Boston Red Sox 1901-2004 16182 8273 7825 84 .514 65-74

3. Cleveland Indians 1901-2004 16178 8209 7877 92 .510 70-69

4. Detroit Tigers 1901-2004 16203 8150 7959 94 .506 62-77

5. Chicago White Sox 1901-2004 16171 8111 7957 103 .505 74-65

6. Kansas City Royals 1969-2004 5695 2816 2877 2 .495 57-82

7. Toronto Blue Jays 1977-2004 4413 2178 2233 2 .494 66-73

8. LA-Cal-Anaheim Angels 1961-2004 7002 3412 3586 4 .488 71-69

9. Phila-KC-Oakland A's 1901-2004 16138 7782 8269 87 .485 85-55

10. Wash Sen #1-Minn Twins 1901-2004 16183 7705 8369 109 .4793 71-67

11. Defunct Clubs (below) 1901-1997 4846 2318 2520 8 .4791 8-7

12. Mil #1-Browns-Orioles 1901-2004 16178 7668 8401 109 .477 56-83

13. Seattle Mariners 1977-2004 4413 2080 2331 2 .472 74-66

14. Wash Sen #2-Tex Rangers 1961-2004 6987 3257 3724 6 .467 66-74

15. Tampa Bay Devil Rays 1998-2004 1131 451 680 0 .393 53-71

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AL TOTALS 163596 81389 81417 790 .49991 960-988

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MLB TOTALS 346782 172352 172352 2078 .500

Defunct clubs, who are defined as those who had no successor franchise in their league, are as follows: NATIONAL LEAGUE: Cincinnati 1876-80 (125-217-6); Louisville 1876-77 (65-61-4); Hartford 1876-77 (78-48-3); New York 1876 (21-35-1); St. Louis 1876-77 (73-51); Philadelphia 1876 (14-45-1); Indianapolis 1878 (24-36-3); Milwaukee 1878 (15-45-1); Providence 1878-85 (438-278-9); Troy 1879-82 (134-191-5); Buffalo 1879-85 (314-333-9); Cleveland 1879-84 (242-299-8); Syracuse 1879 (22-48-1); Worcester 1880-82 (90-159-3); Detroit 1881-88 (426-437-16); St. Louis 1885-86 (79-151-6); Kansas City 1886 (30-91-5); Washington 1886-89 (163-337-14); Indianapolis 1887-89 (146-249-3); Cleveland 1889-99 (738-764-32); Louisville 1892-99 (419-683-19); Washington 1892-99 (410-697-18); and Baltimore 1892-99 (644-447-26). AMERICAN LEAGUE: Baltimore 1901-02 (118-153-5); Seattle/Milwaukee 1969-1997 (franchise moved to NL; AL totals, which are 2200-2367-3, are included in AL, NL totals in NL)

Errata from 2003 standings:

The total games listed for Toronto in 2003 was 4282; this was a simple arithmetic error and did not affect the league or overall totals or percentages, which were correct. Toronto's correct total for 2003 was 4252 and correct total for 2004 is 4413.

2004 Notes:

In 2002, I made a change and wanted to leave this in as a reminder. Due to evidence shown me by SABR member Mark Armour, I removed the 1901-02 Baltimore Oriole records from the Yankee totals and put them under "Defunct Clubs". It is clear to me now that these are two different franchises, with different ownerships and different players.

I continue to believe that the Minnesota Twins' franchise is the continuation of the original Washington Senator club; it had the same ownership and substantially the same players when it moved to Minnesota in 1961, as it had in Washington in 1960, so those franchises will continue to be listed together, as will the second Senator franchise and the current Texas Rangers. Furthermore, when the Expos franchise is relocated to Washington in 2005, I will continue to list the totals as one franchise, probably as "Mon Expos/Wash" and whatever the new team nickname is. This is clearly the same franchise; it will have a new field manager, but will have many of the same players, and the National League did not disband a team and create a new one, but simply moved an existing franchise. Incidentally, though three AL teams (first and second Senators, and Browns) have moved and changed nicknames, this will be the first NL team to do so since 1900.

The Arizona Diamondbacks' miserable 51-win season, the worst in franchise history, dropped their seven-year winning percentage thirty-two points and thus they fell from second to sixth place.

With their 38th win of 2005, the Giants will become the first 10,000-victory team.

The Cardinals' 105-win season, second-best in club history, tacked two full percentage points onto their overall total, an impressive feat given that the 162 games are less than one percent of their total games played. The only other change in the NL standings was the Marlins' move ahead of the Phillies. Note also that the two 1993 expansion teams, the Marlins and Rockies, have nearly identical percentages, the Marlins having played four fewer games and are down two to Colorado in both the win and loss columns. With the Rockies on the decline and the Marlins seemingly on the rise, I would expect Florida to pass them in 2005.

In the AL, the Twins' winning season put them ahead of the AL Defunct Clubs, and the Royals and Blue Jays continued their declines. Both those expansion clubs had at one time been over .500, but now Kansas City sits sixty-one games under and Toronto fifty-five games under. Meanwhile, one of the first-wave expansion teams, the Astros, is on the verge of becoming the first pre-1969 expansion club to break the .500 mark -- it would take a 93-69 season, only one game better than their 2004 season, well in the range of possibility.

The Braves also stand on an historic cusp -- with another first-place season, 30 games over .500 in 2004, they stand forty-one games under .500 for their entire 129-season history. If they can go 102-60 in 2005 -- a great year, to be sure, but not impossible -- they will break .500 for the first time since I have been compiling these standings.

The Yankees, still in first place, of course, actually added a percentage point to their total, moving up to .569 and they now calculate to be mathematically 861 games ahead of the second-place Red Sox, or approximately eight games for every year the AL has been in existence.

I'll bet the Red Sox don't particularly care about that at this moment in history.

The Tigers' historically bad season, in which they set the AL record for losses in a season, dropped their percentage more than two full points, from .509 to .50655 (rounded to .507) That's an amazing drop considering that over 16,000 games are involved. They maintained fourth place, and currently stand 29.5 games ahead of the White Sox. In 2003, they finished 43 gamed behind the White Sox, so they could easily drop to fifth in 2004.

After seven years of interleague play, some of the quirky totals by teams you wouldn't expect to do well have evened out, and the leaders are now the perennially contending Athletics, Yankees and Braves, while the Devil Rays and Brewers (whose combined AL/NL interleague record is 41-55) bring up the rear.

The various hurricanes that slammed into the East Coast during September 2004 forced six games to be postponed -- the entire Chicago Cubs/Florida series in Miami, two Detroit/Tampa Bay games in Tampa, a Pittsburgh/Milwaukee game in Pittsburgh, and a Toronto/Tampa Bay game in Tampa.

The latter two were not made up, and those were the only two non-played games in 2004. The Chicago Cubs/Florida series was made up with a doubleheader in Florida, and the other game was played as part of a doubleheader at Wrigley Field. There were two other Marlins games vs. the Expos that were moved from Florida to US Cellular Field in Chicago, but were played on the originally scheduled dates, so they are not technically considered postponements.

The Detroit/Tampa Bay postponements were, ludicrously, made up as a doubleheader in Tampa -- the day before a three-game series between the same two teams in Detroit.

No tie games were played in 2004.

The National League, which had a thirty-game overall interleague advantage after 2003, had its lead cut to only 28 games, and that was decided only on the very last interleague game of the season, another postponed game between the Phillies and the White Sox, won by the White Sox, nearly two months after the rest of the interleague schedule had been completed. Had the Phillies won that game, the interleague schedule for 2004 would have been exactly tied at 126-126.

The Athletics have the best interleague record at 85-55, and has the most wins, but the Yankees, after starting slowly, are catching up at 82-56. The Marlins, for many years, had the best NL record, but are now slightly behind the Braves (Florida: 77-58; Atlanta: 79-57). The worst interleague record percentage-wise belongs to the Orioles -- 56-83, .403, slightly worse than Pittsburgh's 44-65, .404, and the discrepancies in games played is due to the unequal size of the divisions. Pittsburgh has won the fewest interleague games, 44; Cincinnati is second-fewest with 48.


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